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I just posted a blog entry about Edutopia's summer reading list recommendations for new teachers (http://www.msteacher2.org/profiles/blogs/summer-reading-list-for-new).  It got me thinking about a professional summer reading list for MSP2 members. 

Do you have recommendations for a great summer read for math/science educators? Please chime in if so and the MSP2 team will gather the recommendations and share it in our next newsletter!


Sarita

 

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Hi Sarita - I have every intention of reading Bill Bryson's "A Short History of Nearly Everything." The blurb on the back cover says ... Bryson makes science interesting and funny - you can bet that many questions you have about the universe and the world will be answered here. Kim
Excellent!  This might seem off topic, but I just (finally) ordered Daniel Pink's Drive - The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us" as preparation for a conference I am working on about youth motivation in science and math.   The Amazon review says..."Along the way, [Pink] takes us to companies that are enlisting new approaches to motivation and introduces us to the scientists and entrepreneurs who are pointing a bold way forward."
This book doesn't need any more press, but in case anyone hasn't yet heard of it...I had to recommend "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks" which is still on the NY Times best seller list - almost 2 years now!  "Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor black tobacco farmer whose cells—taken without her knowledge in 1951—became one of the most important tools in medicine, vital for developing the polio vaccine, cloning, gene mapping, in vitro fertilization, and more. Henrietta’s cells have been bought and sold by the billions, yet she remains virtually unknown, and her family can’t afford health insurance."
Currently, I am reading "Managing the madness"by Jack Berckemyer--not specific to math/science HOWEVER each topic he covers can be used to make the learning experience more valuable. Book shows, in a humorous manner, creative responses to grouping, disruptions, and ways to use current technology in the classroom. I have caught myself laughing out loud realizing that his narrative has occured in my classroom. I am excited to implement ideas next year with transitions ifor centers and grouping ideas.

Sorry, but none of my summer reading is directly related to middle school STEM! Here are a few titles:

I'm going to look into the Daniel Pink title, though. Thanks, Sarita.

Great suggestion Vivian, thanks!

Vivian Barker said:
Currently, I am reading "Managing the madness"by Jack Berckemyer--not specific to math/science HOWEVER each topic he covers can be used to make the learning experience more valuable. Book shows, in a humorous manner, creative responses to grouping, disruptions, and ways to use current technology in the classroom. I have caught myself laughing out loud realizing that his narrative has occured in my classroom. I am excited to implement ideas next year with transitions ifor centers and grouping ideas.

Thanks Mary! :)


Mary Henton said:

Sorry, but none of my summer reading is directly related to middle school STEM! Here are a few titles:

I'm going to look into the Daniel Pink title, though. Thanks, Sarita.

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